VMworld Europe 2016 – Day 1

Early morning day 2 of my VMworld 2016 trip seems like the time to do a short recap of yesterday.

Yesterday started with the General Session keynote where Pat Gelsinger and several others presented the view from VMware. Amongst his points I found the following things most interesting:

  • THE buzzword is Digital Transformation
  • Everyone is looking at Traditional vs Digital business
  • However only about 20% of companies are actively looking at doing this. 80% are stuck behind in traditional IT and spend time optimizing predictable processes.
  • Digital Business is the new Industrial Revolution

In 2016 – 10 years ago AWS was launched. Back there were about 29 million workloads running in IT. 2% of that was in the cloud mostly due to Salesforce. 98% was in traditional IT. Skip 5 years ahead now we have 80 million workloads and 7% in public cloud and 6% in private. Remaining 87% still in traditional perhaps virtualized IT. This year we are talking 15% public and 12% private cloud and 73% traditional of 160 million workloads. Pat’s research time have set a specific time and date for when cloud will be 50% (both public and private). That date is June 29th 2021 at 15:57 CEST. We will have about 255 million workloads by then. In 2030 50% of all workloads will be in public clouds. The hosting market is going to keep growing.

Also the devices we are connecting will keep growing. By 2021 we will have 8.7 billion laptops, phones, tablets etc connected. But looking at IoT by Q1 2019 there will be more IoT devices connected than laptops and phones etc and by 2021 18 billion IoT devices will be online.

In 2011 at VMworld in Copenhagen (please come back soon 🙂 ) the SDDC was introduced by Raghu Raghuram. Today we have it and keep expanding on it. So with today vSphere 6.5 and Virtual San 6.5 were announced for release as well as VMware Cloud Foundation as a single SDDC package and VMware Cross Cloud Services for managing your mutliple clouds.

vSphere 6.5 brings a lot of interesting new additions and updates – look here at the announcement. Some of the most interesting features from my view:

  • Native VC HA features with and Active, Passive, witness setup
  • HTML 5 web client for most deployments.
  • Better Appliance management
  • Encryption of VM data
  • And the VCSA is moving from SLES to Photon.

Updates on vCenter and hosts can be found here and here.

I got to stop by a few vendors at the Solutions exchange aswell and talk about new products:

Cohesity:

I talk to Frank Brix at the Cohesity booth who gave me a quick demo and look at their backup product. Very interesting hyper converged backup system that includes backup software for almost all need use cases and it scales linearly. Built-in deduplication and the possibility of presenting NFS/CIFS out of the deduped storage. Definitely worth a look if your are reviewing your backup infrastructure.

HDS:

Got a quick demo on Vvols and how to use it on our VSP G200 including how to move from the old VMFS to Vvols instead. Very easy and smooth process. I also got an update on the UCP platform that now allows for integration with an existing vCenter infrastructure. Very nice feature guys!

Cisco:

I went by the Cisco booth and got a great talk with Darren Williams about the Hyperflex platform and how it can be used in practice. Again a very interesting hyper-converged product with great potential.

Open Nebula:

I stopped by at OpenNebula to look at their vOneCloud product as an alternative to vRealize Automation now that VMware removed it from vCloud Suite Standard. It looks like a nice product – saw OpenNebula during my education back in 2011 I think while it was still version 1 or 2. They have a lot of great features but not totally on par with vRealize Automation – at least yet.

Veeam:

Got a quick walkthrough of the Veeam 9.5 features as well as some talk about Veeam Agent for Windows and Linux. Very nice to see them move to physical servers but there is still some ways to go before the can talk over all backup jobs.

 

Now for Day 2’s General Session!

Cisco UCS Manager AD authentication

Hello all

I have had this on my to-do for a while and finally got around to finishing it – using AD authentication on Cisco UCS Manager (UCSM). Now this is not something necessarily complicated but the official guides expect you to use a single AD domain and use sAMAccountName as the userid attribute. We have a large forest with a single root domain a lot of child domains all with parent-child trust to the root domain. We do not have sAMAccountName uniqueness across domains so instead we use userPrincipalName as the unique identifier for users. Users can also come from any of the child domains so to avoid having to add every domain we usually add a connection to Global Catalog instead. A note – the images below are from the UCSM 3.1 HTML5 interface but it is the same in the older 2.2 Java interface.

Now lets get into it. First things first we need to add domain controllers. I suggest you add two for redundancy purposes. Go to the Admin pane and down to User Management and unfold LDAP. Right click LDAP Providers and click Add.

In the image below I input some mock info but the important parts are to set the full DN of the user UCS should use to bind to AD. If you are using a multi domain forest set Base DN to the root domains Base DN and set the port to 3268 for GC LDAP and 3269 for GC LDAPS (remember to check the SSL box). Set the Filter to userPrincipalName=$userid. Input the password for the Bind account and select MS AD.

LDAP providerClick Next and you will be taken to the LDAP Group Rule and set Group Authorization Enabled and Group Recursion to Recursive. The rest should be default and now look like this:

LDAP group ruleWe now need to make a LDAP Provider Group. Right click the LDAP Provider Group and click Add. Give the group a name and add your domain controllers:

LDAP Provider GroupClick OK to finish creating the provider group. Now we need to add some group mappings for use with Group Authorization. Right click LDAP Group Maps and click Add. In the GUI below input the group DN and select which roles they should have. You can use the built in roles or create your own. Click OK to save.

LDAP Group MapsFinally, and this is where the magic happens, add a new Authentication Domain. Unfold Authentication under User Management and right click Authentication Domains and click Add. Give your Domain a name (you will see this when you login) and Select LDAP. Once LDAP is selected a drop-down will be show where you can select the LDAP Provider Group you created earlier. Once done click OK to save.

Authentication Domain

From now on when you access the login page you will see a drop down in which you can select either Native or the name of your Authentication domain. Select your Authentication domain and input your userPrincipalName and password in the fields and enjoy using AD login!

Production Cluster Upgrade

During the spring of this year me and a few of my colleagues spent several months of meetings with storage solution providers and server hardware manufacturers to figure out if we should try out something new for our VMware production clusters. We had a budget for setting up a new cluster so we wanted to look at our options for trying something other than our traditional blade solutions we a spinning disk FC array which we have been using for years.

Some of the considerations we made regarding storage were that we wanted to start to leverage flash in some way or form to boost intense workloads. So the storage solution would need to use flash to accelerate IO. We also wanted to look at if server side flash could accelerate our IO as well. This lead us to the conclusion that we would like to avoid blades this time around. We would have more flexibility using rack servers with respect to more disk slots, PCIe expansions etc. Going with e.g. 1U server we would be sacrificing 6 additional rack units compared to 16 blades in a 10U blade chassis. Not huge in our infrastructure.

So we a bunch of different storage vendors, some new ones like Nimble Storage, Tintri, Pure Storage and some of the old guys like Hitachi and EMC. On the server side we talk to the regulars like Dell and HP but also Hitachi and Cisco.

All in all it was a great technically interesting spring and by summer we were ready to make our decision. In the end we decided to go with a known storage vendor but a new product. We chose a Hitachi VSP G200 as it in controller strength was on par with our existing HUS130 controllers but with smarter software and more cache. The configuration we went with was a tiered storage pool with a tier 1 layer consisting of 4 FMD 1.6TB in RAID10. This gives us 3.2TB Tier 1 storage and from the tests we have run – this tier is REALLY fast! The second and last tier is a large pool of 10K 1.2 TB disks for capacity. Totally we have just shy of 100TB of disk space on the array. It is setup so all new pages are written to the 10k layer but if data is hot it is migrated to the FMD layer within 30 seconds utilising Hitachi’s Active Flash technology. This feature takes some CPU cycles from the controller but from what we see right now this is a good trade off. We can grow to twice the size in capacity and performance as the configuration is at the moment so we should be safe for the duration of the arrays life.

On the server side we chose something new to us. We went with a rack server based Cisco UCS solution. A cluster consisting of 4x C220 M4 with 2x E5-2650V3 CPU’s and 384GB memory. We use a set of 10k disks in RAID1 for ESXi OS (yes we are very traditional and not very “Cisco UCS” like). The servers are equipped with 4x 10G in the form of a Cisco VIC 1227 MLOM and a Cisco VIC 1225 PCIe. As we were not really that hooked on setting up a SSD read cache (looking at vFlash for now) in production with out trying it we actually got a set of additional Cisco servers for some test environments. These are identical to the above but as some of my colleagues needed to test additional PCIe cards we went with C240 M4 instead for the additional PCIe slots. Two of these servers got a pair of 400GB SSD’s to test out vFlash. If it works we are moving those SSD’s to the production servers for use.

As I said we got the servers late summer and put the into production about 2½ months ago and boy we are not disappointed. Some of our workloads have experienced 20-50% improvements in performance. We ended up installing ESXi5.5 U3a and joining our existing 5.5 infrastructure due to time constraints. We are still working on getting vSphere 6.0 ready so hopefully that will happen in early spring next year.

We have made some interesting configurations on the Cisco UCS solution regarding the network adapters and vNic placement so I will throw up something later on how this was done. We also configured AD login using UserPrincipalName instead of sAMAccountName which was not in the documentation – stay tuned for that as well. And finally – have a nice Christmas all!